Simply Beautiful Furniture.

furniture

Our Shirlington Built-In Expert

Date added: 19-01-2012

Larry Northrop, our Shirlington Showroom Manager was recently featured in The Northern Virginia magazine. If you didn’t see it, here’s the magazine and his article on built-ins.

Northern Virginian Built In Cover

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Linda Jones Captures Our Eyes and Our Landscapes

Date added: 14-04-2011

Last fall, I had the opportunity to go to the Great Falls Studio Art Tour.  My first stop was at Linda Jones’ home/studio.  I fell in love with her paintings the moment I saw them, and I knew I had to ask her if she would be willing to display her artwork in our showrooms.  To our luck, she said yes.  And here we are now, with our newest artist displaying her artwork proudly at Hardwood Artisans.

Californian Oranges in acrylics by Linda Jones (This painting can be viewed in our Alexandria Showroom)

It’s no wonder that Linda has been inspired to paint.  Born and raised on the south coast of England, Linda has been surrounded by beautiful landscapes and scenery her entire life.  Her interest in landscapes transformed into the study of geology and geography, and even as she was teaching the subject, she encouraged her students to sketch the landscape to understand it better.

Turtle Stones in watercolor by Linda Jones (This painting can be viewed in our Rockville Showroom)

Like many families that move to the US (including my own), the plan was for Linda and her family to move temporarily to Virginia for 2 years.  That was in 1989.  22 years of living in the woods of Great Falls and within walking distance from the Potomac, gives her all the inspiration needed for her paintings.  Having been to her home, I can see why Linda is inspired.  She has pointed out to me the several birds that she painted just by looking out her window.

Red-Shouldered Hawk in watercolor by Linda Jones (This painting can be viewed in our Alexandria Showroom)

Although Linda has been sketching and painting since she was a child, she picked up her aunt’s set of watercolors at the age of 9 or 10 and started painting the roses outside in the garden, she had not studied any form of art until her daughter went away to college to study art herself.  Linda did not realize that by taking her daughter’s advice, she would be turning her whole life around.  (Linda’s daughter now works in art therapy with Alzheimer’s patients, and is also an extremely talented painter herself).

Limelight in watercolor by Linda Jones (This painting can be viewed in our Rockville Showroom)

Linda has experimented with different mediums, but she prefers watercolor, acrylics and mixed media (involving fabric and paper collages).  Almost all of her subjects tend towards realism, but she also enjoys painting abstracts.  “Although most of my paintings are inspired by my immediate environment, I am fortunate to have travelled to paint in other parts of North America and Europe”, she says.  She loves natural woods, such as maple, cherry and walnut, for framing her paintings, as she feels it’s very appropriate for her themes.  She does all the framing herself.

A painting in progress

Linda painting ‘plein air’

Considering all the inspiring landscapes around her, Linda loves painting ‘plein air’ but usually tends to finish her paintings in her studio.  She loves painting in subtleties and vibrancies of colors, especially showing the way the natural light hits her subjects.  The best way to truly understand what Linda does is to take a look at her paintings yourself.

Daybreak in watercolor by Linda Jones (This painting can be viewed in our Fairfax showroom)

Linda’s gorgeous artwork is on display at our Fairfax, Alexandria and Rockville showrooms.  For more information, go to the Great Falls Studios website (where Linda is a board member) to take a look at their annual tour, or click here to be directed to her website to view more of her artwork.

You can also view Linda’s works at the Garrett Arts Gallery Shop in Oakland, MD and the Deep Creek Lake Visitor’s Center in McHenry, MD.

March “Tour” Madness!

Date added: 08-04-2011

We had an incredibly exciting March 31st at our Woodbridge shop. At 10:00 am, two buses arrived in our parking lot, stuffed to the brim with first graders. At first sight, the buses were quite intimidating and I almost began looking for a table to hide under. I (luckily) regained my composure and greeted the newcomers, all 80 of them.  This crowd came about after we received a call about a month ago from Dale City Elementary School. They were interested in getting a tour of our Woodshop for all 80 of their first graders. My first reaction, echoed by many others, was ‘eighty?!’. However, once everyone got over their initial shock, we were all buzzing with excitement and ideas. We’ve given large tours before, but as far as I know, never to 80 first graders, so it was just as much of a new experience for us as it was for the kids.

I was speechless when I saw the two buses pull into the lot, but somehow managed to introduce myself and get them all into the showroom. In my flustered state, I was unable to take a picture of all of the children filing off of the bus, but I did snap a few of the hectic day! Check them out below and let us know what you think.

Here’s Kevin Carlson explaining the tour system to the first graders and their chaperones. Let me tell you, that showroom gets hot with that many tiny bodies packed in there!

They made themselves comfortable on the Showroom floor as the first tour was dispatched. We figured that a group of ten children would be manageable for one craftsman and two chaperones. I’ve never seen children that excited to put on a pair of safety glasses!

Emily Rupert and I tried to keep the children occupied by showing them some of the pieces in our showroom and answering questions.

I asked them what they thought our Library Wall Bed was and I received the answer ‘it’s a shelf, DUH.’ It was only when I pulled the bed down did the ‘ooh’s and ‘ahh’s start. The reaction to our Glasgow TV Lift was one of pure earsplitting joy, which is something the first graders and I have in common.

A few of the questions that Emily and I faced:

“Where do you get your wood?”

“Why do you make everything out of wood?”

“Are your lamps made out of wood?”

“How much does that cost?”

“How much does the entire company cost?”

“How did you become a craftsman?” (I’m proud to say that several of the children want to become craftsman when they grow up!)

“Can I buy that for a dollar?”

“How much does the world cost?”

“Is the world made of wood?”

It’s safe to say that these kids were very curious and did pose some very good questions!

Here is Jermaine with his first tour group!

Jermaine handed out ear plugs, just in case the noises of the shop became too loud. Most of the kids wanted to save the ear plugs for later. I hope they didn’t put them in when they got back to the classroom!

Here is Jermaine’s group touching the dried out lumber that we keep stacked in the front of the shop. They all wanted to know how it went from rough to smooth and finished like the furniture in our showroom.

Mike Chubb had an incredible height difference between him and the children. I think the kids might’ve had kinks in their necks after this tour, but Mike was great with kids and answered all of their questions, so I don’t think they minded much!

Greg Smith showed his group how the CNC machine works (Computer Numeric Control machine… which means that it’s like a giant printer). This is one of the largest machines in the shop.

Kevin Parker with the Bacci Machine and his amazed group!

This was Emily’s last effort to entertain the kiddos – she let them climb the Loft Bed ladder one by one, until all 80 had a turn. You want to test the durability of your furniture? Let 80 first graders have at it!

Here’s the final turn out in front of our Woodbridge Shop! Not everyone is looking at the camera, but I consider it a great success. (Let’s forget the fact that I had to practically stand in the street to take this photo!)

We sent the kids, teachers, and chaperones back to school with gift bags and a personalized sign with all of the craftsman’s signatures on it.

We all had too much fun giving these tours! We thoroughly enjoyed Dale City Elementary School’s visit and hope that we get to see them in the future (maybe as craftsmen themselves!) Always keep in mind that we offer free tours, even to large groups such as this. We benefit from it just as much, if not more, than you will. If you’re interested in receiving a tour, email me at lorelei@hardwoodartisans.com or come into our Woodbridge Shop and we will have one of our talented craftsmen show you around!

Photo Contest 2010 – Results 3/3

Date added: 03-02-2011

The third and final installment of our Photo Contest results contains several of our favorites. Enjoy!

This custom built-in window bench looks great in this room and made most of us want to pick up a book and settle in.

I can’t decide what looks better – the ship or the Hall Table underneath it!

Can you just say ‘aww’? This adorable dog makes this dining table look absolutely adorable.

Marleen’s Highland Dining Table and sideboard look great together!

Nicole has a great dining room set! And great photography skills – she was one of our Honorable Mentions.

This Waterfall bed fits in perfectly with the feel of the oriental decor in this bedroom.

This photo shows off the dovetail joinery of our drawers and the gorgeous cut of our wood… but it’s hard to look beyond the cute cat. Nick doesn’t need to get a cat bed – it looks perfectly happy in our Craftsman chest.

Thank you for looking at the results and entering the contest! We all enjoyed it. Keep an eye out for more blogs in the future – especially for one on our Cutting Edge event for those of you who can’t make it down for the festivities.

Bill and Dru Vodra: Just Like Family

Date added: 21-02-2010
Look inside the Vodras’ lovely home on the Potomac River in Alexandria, and you’ll find a collection of Hardwood Artisans furniture dating back to their first purchase in 1985.

Look inside the Vodras’ lovely home on the Potomac River in Alexandria, and you’ll find a collection of Hardwood Artisans furniture dating back to their first purchase in 1985.

Bill and Dru Vodra have so much of our furniture in their Alexandria home that when I went to visit the other day, he laid out one rule for the tour: “The default position here is, it’s Hardwood Artisans. We’ll tell you what’s not.”

Bill and Dru Vodra sit on one of our sofas in their living room.

Bill and Dru Vodra sit on one of our sofas in their living room.

The Vodras are among our dearest customers who keep coming back for more, and it’s with their constant support, input, and ideas that our lines have evolved from just loft beds to any imaginable case good for the home.

That’s why, when they walked into one of our showrooms recently and a sales associate who didn’t know them approached, co-founder Larry Spinks waved off the associate. “Oh, don’t bother with them – they’re family.”

Keep reading to get the full house tour.

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Mad for Murphy Beds

Date added: 05-02-2010

For a while, I thought Murphy beds only lived on old sitcoms. Honestly? I didn’t think they existed anymore. I laughed when Mark Gatterdam first told me that Hardwood Artisans made Murphy beds – I thought it was a joke. I had in my head this image of some cheap bed falling out of the wall, hitting some poor slob over the head with a laugh-track voiceover.

Weeellll, not so much, it turns out. The way these artisans make enclosures for the Murphy bed, so you would never know there was actually a bed in back, was a surprise to me.

“People are so amazed to see they still exist,” Mark says. On most of the Hardwood Artisans beds, all internal bed mechanisms come from the original Murphy Bed company.

One of them is featured in the current online edition of Washington Spaces magazine, where Joan and Jack Dempsey hired us to build one for their small basement so it could be used as a guest room—when it wasn’t in use as a poker room or wine cellar.

Larry Northrop worked with the Dempseys to modify the standard measurements of the Library Bed so it would fit perfectly into their space. Photograph © Morgan Howarth

Larry Northrop worked with the Dempseys to modify the standard measurements of the Library Bed so it would fit perfectly into their space. Photograph © Morgan Howarth

“I’ve known about Hardwood Artisans for years,” Joan Dempsey says. When she and her husband downsized to a remodeled carriage house in Alexandria, they knew they wanted a Murphy bed. “We knew they did extremely high-quality work, so it was a no-brainer to go with them.”

And because these beds come with Tempur-Pedic mattresses, she adds, it’s much more comfortable than a typical pull-out. The ultimate compliment came from her 16-year-old nephew: “He said he had never slept in a better bed. He talks about it all the time. I don’t know what kind of cat nip they have in that bed, but it was amazing.”

Another project in DC’s Chinatown (which I blogged about for Washington Spaces last year) allows Annie Kammerer to work in a sleek, contemporary office by day, but still make it welcome for guests at night.

Not only does the custom unit fold down into a bed, a panel on the outside also folds down into extra desk space.

Home office with a modified Panel bed

The bed is more comfortable for guests than a sofa bed because it features a standard mattress.

The bed is more comfortable for guests than a sofa bed because it features a standard mattress.

The bed is more comfortable for guests than a sofa bed because it features a standard mattress.

Annie had this to say about the outcome, which she shared on the Spaces blog:

“The den really functions as both a spacious office and a cozy guest room–I swear it doubled in size with this installation. The guest drawers to the left of the double bed (coupled with the closet) make the room comfortable for two guests. The office is definitely the most Zen space I’ve ever had to work in.”

Joan Dempsey says she turned to us because no other company would agree to change their measurements for her space, and much of what Hardwood Artisans does is custom. “It wouldn’t have worked if they had not worked with me.”

Take a look at our Murphy beds online or in our of our four showrooms.

Chairing the Burden

Date added: 20-01-2010

What’s in a chair? Much more than you’d think.

I heard once that the term “chairman” originated centuries ago, when dwellings had little in the way of furniture. When there was a chair, there was usually just one, and it was reserved for the most important person in the house, or an honored guest.

When it comes to building chairs, this piece of furniture that most of us (and our fannies) take for granted still retains its perch on top of the furniture-making hierarchy.

Stacks of chairs in our Woodbridge shop await the final finishing process. They’ve all traveled a long, meticulous road from blueprint to reality.

General Manager Greg Gloor explains why chair-making is so difficult: “You can have a dresser that looks good, and it’s good dresser. You can have a good-looking chair – but it’s damned uncomfortable. A chair has to cradle and support the human body, which no other piece of furniture does. It’s the most meticulous work we do in the shop because the pieces are so small compared to what you’re asking them to do.”

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Field Trip to Pope-Leighey House

Date added: 05-10-2009

Last week, a bunch of us from Hardwood Artisans visited the Pope-Leighey House, which was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939. Though it was moved from Falls Church to its existing location on the grounds of Woodlawn in Alexandria in order to make way for the new Interstate 66 in 1964, the home is still oriented the way it would have been in Falls Church and great care was taken to adjust the topography of the new location to closely match the old.

Unfortunately, taking pictures inside is not allowed, but the photographers in our group (Alanna, our marketing coordinator, Jason, a craftsman and design team member and Mark, one of the owners) got some great shots of the exterior.

Here’s a selection:

The cantilevered roof makes the home appear much larger than it actually is. In reality, it is only 1200 square feet.

The cantilevered roof makes the home appear much larger than it actually is. In reality, it is only 1200 square feet.

A great view of the entirety of the cantilevered roof.

A great view of the entirety of the cantilevered roof.

View of the private side of the home from behind the hemicycle garden.

View of the private side of the home from behind the "hemicycle" garden.

Holes cut into the cantilevered roof in back allow more light to enter the childrens bedroom at the back of the home.

Holes cut into the cantilevered roof in back allow more light to enter the childrens' bedroom at the back of the home.

By leaving the wood unfinished, the home requires no paint and no exterior maintenance. It was designed to weather to match the bark of the trees on the property.

By leaving the wood unfinished, the home requires no paint and no exterior maintenance. It was designed to weather to match the bark of the trees on the property.

Most of us were fairly disappointed by the furniture, which was innovative, but not particularly well-designed. For example, all the tables in the home are the same size and height, which meant than the owner could use them to create one very large table, but the legs were awkwardly positioned in relation to the chairs, meaning you would nearly always be straddling either a leg or a seam between the tables. The furniture was also all plywood, which was a new, hip, expensive material when the home was built, but which looks rather unfinished to the modern eye.

That said, there was some fabulous floating shelving in the living room where they used L-brackets, but put the bottom part of the “L” behind the paneling so the shelves are more stable than the floating shelves you would typically see today.

All in all, it was a really fun trip. Despite our reservations about the furniture, the architecture is interesting and getting the story behind the home and the two families who owned it was enlightening.

Hi from Jason, Mark, Alison, Alanna, Katie & Edwin!

Hi from Jason, Mark, Alison, Alanna, Katie & Edwin!

Plywood 101 (part 1)

Date added: 18-07-2009

Lamination is a four-letter word in the consumer’s mind today. This is largely because so many people have been screwed over by poor laminates over secondary substrates. Ply, as it applies here, is a single thickness, fold or layer. Our plywood is referred to as hardwood plywood. This is because the substrate is made up of layers of hardwood. Specifically, poplar, basswood and luan are some of the woods used to make up the core.

Other plywood cores are made up of particle board, straw board, wheat board and medium density fiberboard (MDF). These are often viewed as inferior because they don’t last very long. There is far less strength associated with these other cores because they are not laminated (except MDF). Lamination is simply the process of building up something in thin sheets or layers. Ply is therefore the thing, and lamination is the process.

Layers of ply are oriented at right angle to each other. When you look at the end of one of our adjustable shelves, you see dark and light alternating colors. What you are seeing are the alternating grains. End grain is darker than long grain. This is what makes plywood strong and stable. In this case “stable” means that it doesn’t expand and contract nearly as much as solid hardwood does, making it in some ways, a more versatile material.

The top coating on plywood is called the veneer. The wood veneer that is applied to the surface of plywood is about 1/32 inches thick. Each strip of veneer you see on the plywood is referred to as flitch. The seams are called flitch seams. The flitch pattern should be a perfect match, much like the book matching on our doors, done over and over again. Another veneer process, though less common, is called rotary cut veneer. This would be like rolling a log with a knife against it, peeling up the wood in a solid continuous sheet. This is a more sophisticated machining process, as you can imagine.

In part 2 of this series, we’ll explain more about plywood and how it functions in good quality furniture.

In the meantime, here’s a video from Bob Vila about how plywood is made.

http://video.bobvila.com/m/21319559/making-birch-veneer-plywood.htm

Luxury

Date added: 03-03-2009

My lovely wife, Erika, has been laying her clothes on the bathroom floor for the last few weeks. No, she hasn’t gone insane, at least not in the traditional sense of the word.

When we built our home eight years ago, we added a few “luxury” things, like a heated floor system in the master bath. We had some problems with the system initially, so we didn’t use it much until this year.

So, I got up this morning to 12 degree weather, snow and ice everywhere, and winds of 30mph. After taking a ridiculously hot shower – the kind that takes skin off, I hop out to slide into warm socks…and jeans…and shirt. There is very little in this world that is better than the feeling of being engulfed by warmth, especially on a morning like this one.

I felt bad having splurged on a heated floor and the electricity it consumes, until I remember that my lovely wife, Erika, has yet to turn on the heater this year! The wood stove is working overtime for sure. Tabby, our cat, really appreciates the heated floor too.

While it seems like an unnecessary cost, the actual cost of running the heated floor is about the same as leaving on a table lamp. This versus the cost of running a heating system in a house makes the heated floor seem like a good, not so luxurious, item to splurge on.

While many people consider our furniture a luxury, I never have. I consider it a good value. To me this means something that lasts, is appreciated often, and has more value for the purchaser than the cost of the item itself.

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